Tag Archives: Artful Thinking

English 9 Enriched: “La Belle Dame Sans Merci”

The students read and analyzed John Keats’ poem, “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” and we then did a Visible Thinking exercise using artwork that was inspired by Keats’ poem.

They had their choice from the following paintings:

Walter Crane

Walter Crane (1865)

Arthur Hughes

Arthur Hughes (1861-63)

Frank Cadogan Cowper

Frank Cadogan Cowper (1926)

Henry Maynell Rheam

Henry Meynell Rheam (1901)

JW Waterhouse

John William Waterhouse (1893)

Robert Anning Bell

Robert Anning Bell

Sir Frank Dicksee

Sir Frank Dicksee (1902)

Once the class voted on the painting they wished to work with, we did a See/Think/Wonder exercise in which they had to focus on how the painting reflected specific imagery in Keats’ poem.  We share their responses using Post-Its and then wrote a three-chunk paragraph analyzing the painting using textual support from the poem.

Visible Thinking Belle Dame

While the students were writing, we listened to the following musical interpretation of “La Belle Dame Sans Merci” as performed by Jesse Ferguson.

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Filed under Domain 2: Classroom Environment, Domain 3: Instruction, English 9 Enriched, Visible Thinking

English 9 Regents: Art and “The Most Dangerous Game”

Look at both of the following paintings:

MostDangerousGameShipwreck

The Most Dangerous Game by Anonymous

sirens_cove

Sirens Cove found on deviantART (yet no artist attributed)

 

SEE:

Students list five very specific details they see in each painting, and then share their lists with a partner.  Any details that they have in common are marked with a checkmark (so that less obvious details stand out to them for later).

THINK:

Students put three things they think about the painting represents some aspect of “The Most Dangerous Game” by Richard Connell.

WONDER:

Students put three things they wonder about the painting represents some aspect of the short story.

Students each get one Post-It Note.  One color for each: See, Think, or Wonder.  Students then share Post-It Notes.

MDG

WRITING:

Students will write a three chunk paragraph about how the paintings are a representation of some aspect of the short story “The Most Dangerous Game” by Richard Connell.   Along with mentioning details from both paintings in their paragraphs, they must also cite correlating text from the short story as support for their claim.

The idea was to get the students to make a connection between the Sirens episode in The Odyssey and how General Zaroff lures ships–and subsequently sailors– to his island so that he might kill them.

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Filed under Domain 1: Planning and Preparation, Domain 2: Classroom Environment, Domain 3: Instruction, English 9 Regents

English 9 Enriched: Frankenstein and the Sublime in Art

This Visible Thinking activity is done with a twist.  Instead of merely sharing something simple that they see, think, or wonder, students must stretch to use adjective/noun combinations for what they see, similes for what they think, and metaphors for what they wonder… all relating to the sublime.

I let the classes select one of the following paintings:

800px-Cole_Thomas_The_Course_of_Empire_The_Arcadian_or_Pastoral_State_1836

The Arcadian or Pastoral State by Thomas Cole

800px-Cole_Thomas_The_Course_of_Empire_The_Savage_State_1836

The Savage State by Thomas Cole

il-penseroso-1845_jpg!Blog

Il Penseroso by Thomas Cole (inspired by “L’Allegro,” a poem by John Milton)

Peace%20at%20Sunset%20Thomas%20Cole

Peace at Sunset by Thomas Cole

Kindred Spirits

Kindred Spirits by Asher Brown Durand (depicting painter Thomas Cole and poet William Cullen Bryant)

 

SEE:

Students list ten very specific details they see in the painting, and then share their list with a partner.  Any details that they have in common are marked with a checkmark (so that less obvious details stand out to them for later).

THINK:

Students put three things they think about the painting represents the sublime.

WONDER:

Students put three things they wonder about the painting represents the sublime.

Students each get one Post-It Note.  One color for each: See, Think, or Wonder. 

For those with the color for SEE, they have to use an adjective/adjective/noun combination to describe something they see that represents the sublime.

For those with the color for THINK, they have to create a simile about how they think something in the painting represents the sublime.

For those with the color for WONDER, they have to create a metaphor for what they wonder about how the artist created the sublime on canvas.

Students then share Post-It Notes on the front board.

2013-05-10 09.13.17

WRITING:

Students will write a three chunk paragraph about how the painting is a representation of the sublime, much like Victor’s escape to nature after the deaths of William and Justine.  Be sure to define and explain “sublime” as it relates to both the painting and the novel.

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Filed under Domain 1: Planning and Preparation, Domain 2: Classroom Environment, Domain 3: Instruction, English 9 Enriched, Visible Thinking